DIY Eco-Friendly Cleaners for Your Home’s Exterior

Spring cleaning is here! Daylight savings has officially started, which means we get just a little more sunlight in the evenings. I don’t know about you, but that usually motivates me to get some deep cleaning done and check in on everything now that winter is a not-so-distant memory.

Here at S&K, we are always trying to find the best, eco-friendly ways to keep our homes nice. While our energy efficient window options are a great way to do that, there are so many other ways that a home can stay eco-friendly, like cleaning supplies. Outdoor cleaning supplies tend to be harsh and heavy in chemicals since we don’t have to live with the fumes or worry about sleeping in the same room as the solution, but those chemicals can affect the environment. Check out some easy DIY cleaning solutions that will let you do your spring cleaning with a clean conscience.

Window Cleaner:

  • 2 tbsp white vinegar
  • 2 cups water
  • 10 drops essential oil of lemon

Mix the ingredients in a glass spray bottle to avoid the oils breaking down. To use, spray on a glass surface and use a microfiber cloth to polish.

All-Purpose Cleaner:

  • 15 drops of essential oil of lemon
  • 5 drops essential oil of sweet orange
  • 5 drops essential oil of rosemary
  • 1/4 cup distilled white vinegar
  • 1-½ cups water

Mix ingredients together in a glass spray bottle (a funnel helps with this step). The vinegar scent will dissipate after use and leave a nice fresh scent behind. Lemon oil is a natural disinfectant, orange oil busts grease, and rosemary oil has some antibacterial and antiseptic qualities. This concoction is great for wiping down patio furniture.

Patio Cleaner:

  • ½ cup baking soda
  • 1 gallon of water
  • ⅛ cup natural liquid dish detergent – I’m a fan of Dr. Bronners.

Mix ingredients and spray onto patio surface. Let the solution sit for 30 minutes, then scrub and rinse with your garden hose.

Image via The Greatist

Interested in creating your own cleaning solutions? Once you have an understanding of what natural options work well together, you can play with different essential oils that are heavy lifters in the cleaning department, or simply smell nice, to make a solution that is all your own.

Not only are these a great way to help the environment, these cleaners are a fraction of the cost of commercial cleaners. Happy cleaning!

Upcycle Your Old Windows: 8 DIY Projects

You’ve finally done it. You’ve committed to getting new windows installed by S&K and now you have old window panes and shutters to worry about. First off, congratulations on your new windows! Secondly, why not upcycle your old windows to create new and fun decor in your home? We’re all about finding creative ways to recycle old goods, so check out these 12 do-it-yourself projects that transform your previous windows into something new:

Divided Chalkboard:

 

Great for decor and even better for communicating with your family, this chalkboard window is a perfect way to use an old window frame. It may look complicated, but all you need to do is clean the glass, tape off the frame, and spray with chalkboard paint! Easy as one, two, three. Check out a tutorial here.

Accented Mirror:

A mirror like this can be used in an entryway, restroom, or even as a piece of decor in a living room. Simply remove the glass frames and replace them with mirrors (or potentially one large mirror). You can learn more in this tutorial.

Fireplace Screen:


Image via DIYnCrafts

An unexpected and innovative way to reuse your old window, this fireplace screen is easy to make. Follow this tutorial for a step-by-step guide.

Family Picture Frames:


These rustic window frames are perfect to transition into a picture frame. You can paint the wood however you’d like to match your decor the add family photos. Learn how to do it here.

Box Planter:

Image via 1001Gardens

Take your DIY projects outside with this converted window to box planter. This is a great project for spring and adds just the right amount of rustic flair. Find a brief tutorial here.

Pot Rack:

Talk about a functional use of an old object! This upcycled pot rack is a great way to use you old windows and save space in the kitchen. Achieve this look by following the tutorial.

Gallery Wall:


Perhaps the easiest way to upcycle your old windows, especially if you have a bunch of different sizes and shapes. Clean off your old windows and hang them in a gallery wall. Add a pop of color, like the wreath in the photo above, to brighten up the look.

Advent Calendar:

Expand your holiday decor by transforming an old window frame into an advent calendar. This would be a great addition to any mantle or living room during the holiday season. Follow a tutorial here.

There are tons of other things you can use your old windows for, like shelving, making a small greenhouse, and more. What do you plan on doing with your old windows?

 

 

Grate diy Light Fixture!

Cheese Grater Lighting

An Easy DIY project

Source: Hallmark Channel

Paige Hemmis has a creative and unusual way to use cheese graters.

DIY Cheese Grater Lights

Materials
  • 3 Cheese graters (Use the 4-sided stand-up cheese grater)
  • 3 black pendent hanging Edison lights (I ordered the Edison plug-in hanging socket pendent light fixture in matte black from Amazon)
  • 3 “make a lamp” kits (I ordered the lamp base socket kit from Amazon)
  • 1 piece of 2”x6” wood cut in three (3) 8”x8” pieces
  • Drill
  • Drill bit just slightly larger than your electrical cord
  • 3 Light bulbs
  • Scissors or wire cutters

DIY Cheese Grater Lights – Home & Family

Paige Hemmis is giving your lights an industrial update with the help of cheese graters.

OPTIONAL: You can change the color of your cheese graters if you would like. You can spray paint them any color (make sure you use a spray paint that can handle high heat), or you can distress the metal color with a butane torch by applying it to the grater.

1) Spray paint, high heat (Optional)

2) Butane torch (Optional)

Directions

1) Choose your favorite cheese graters and hanging pendent lights.

2) Cut your 2”x6” piece of wood into 3 8”x8” square pieces. You can have your local hardware store do this for you if you do not have a saw at home.

3) OPTIONAL: This is where you would either torch or paint the cheese grater.

4) Mark the center of your board and drill a hole just slightly bigger than your cord in the wood.

5) Mark the center of the handle of your cheese graters and drill the same size hole in the top of the cheese grater handles.

6) Cut off the plug end of your electrical cord (MAKE SURE that it is NOT plugged in at the time!)

7) Take your electrical cord and run it up through the cheese grater (so that the socket part would be facing down in the grater). Thread the cord through the cheese grater handle and through the wood.

8) Repeat this step on all pendants.

9) Take the “make a lamp kit” and finish off the cut end of your cord according to the manufacturer’s instructions.

10) Repeat this step on all pendants.

11) Run all three cords together at the very top and attach them together

12) Voila! Plug in your light fixture and enjoy your “grate” glow!

Get more information about this episode >>

Check out more fun DIY projects at the Home & family Pinterest Page

Cool Outdoor Tin Can Lights

Check out this great outdoor lighting idea!

Source: inhabitat.com

 

DIY, summer, craft, recycled, tin can, lantern, punched, votive, how-to

STEP 1: GATHER YOUR MATERIALS

All you need to do to get started on this eco-friendly summer craft project is gather the following materials:

  • 2-4 cleaned, empty tin cans (you can use any size)
  • a hammer
  • an assortment of nails (for larger or smaller holes)
  • colorful permanent markers
  • paper, pencil, masking tape, scissors (if you plan to use a pattern)
  • votive candles
  • a towel

DIY, summer, craft, recycled, tin can, lantern, punched, votive, how-to

STEP 2: CLEAN AND FREEZE

With your newly gathered used tin cans, remove labels, and clean thoroughly. Fill each can with water and freeze overnight until solid. The ice stabilizes the can and prevents it from bending when you punch holes in them later.

DIY, summer, craft, recycled, tin can, lantern, punched, votive, how-to

STEP 3: DESIGN YOUR PUNCH GRAPHIC

Decide on a design for your punched-tin decorations. You can draw the pattern out ahead of time on a piece of graph paper and tape it to the can as a guide. Alternatively, you can freehand a design without marking it ahead of time. Knitting patterns, wallpaper, textiles, and folk art are all great inspiration sources for patterns!

DIY, summer, craft, recycled, tin can, lantern, punched, votive, how-to

STEP 4: PUNCH OUT YOUR PATTERN

Cradle the frozen tin can in a folded towel (to prevent the can from moving and to catch ice chips). Position a sharp, narrow nail above each mark on your pattern and gently tap it 3-4 times with the hammer until just the point has punched the tin can.  Repeat for each mark until you have completed your pattern.

DIY, summer, craft, recycled, tin can, lantern, punched, votive, how-to

STEP 5: REMOVE THE ICE BLOCK

Rinse the can under a hot tap until the ice block pops out and allow the can to dry.

DIY, summer, craft, recycled, tin can, lantern, punched, votive, how-to

STEP 6: ADD SOME COLOR

If you want to add color to your new punched-tin lantern, you can create a variety of fun, shiny designs by simply using colorful permanent markers.

DIY, summer, craft, recycled, tin can, lantern, punched, votive, how-to

STEP 7: LIGHT ‘EM UP!

Drop in some lighted votive candles and enjoy the fun, flickering patterns cast by your new handmade lanterns! Be sure to place the lanterns on a fire-safe surface as the candles can get hot.

Make Your Own Bacon Candle!

Make Your Own Bacon Candle

Finally The Perfect Candle Scent

Source: Diyjoy

Love bacon and DIY? If so, this is absolutely the most awesome idea ever! Learn how to make homemade bacon candles to scent your home with bacon all day long. This nifty trick also makes great use of leftover bacon grease, which I had always wondered what to do with. Excellent crafting tutorial for men, this one is just fun and cool. Have fun this weekend making bacon candles, which also make awesome Christmas gift ideas for the person who has everything.

How To Make Bacon Candles – Video Tutorial

movie night outside

Take Family Movie Night Outside

Take Family Movie Night Outside

Make an outdoor portable movie screen for under $10

 

movie night outside

If you regularly tear the wrinkled sheets off your bed to use them as a makeshift projector screen, it’s time to upgrade. Make this portable screen on the cheap that stashes away in a closet til the next time you need it.

The DIY portable projector screen project over at Instructables can be whipped together in about an hour, and costs next to nothing to assemble. All you need is a white sheet, some eyelets, a few screw-in hooks, and about 12 feet of PVC pipe.

There’s only five steps involved in making the screen:

1. Decide what size you want. Mine is 5 feet wide by 6 feet tall.
2. Cut and sew the top and sides. Leave a couple inches extra on each side so you can fold it over and sew a seam.
3. Insert eyelets. One on each side of the top.
4. Sew in PVC pipe. This is to make it hang flat and straight, and to make it easy to roll up and store. Just fold the bottom over the PVC, crease the sheet, take out the pipe and sew all the way across. Then slide the pipe in and sew the sides shut.
5. Put the hooks in your ceiling. I put some in my living room, my bedroom, and another bedroom. They’re hardly noticeable so I just leave them up there all the time.

Using a bedsheet for this project is a super-inexpensive way to get the job done, and you can get them everywhere from Target to Goodwill. If you’re looking for a sturdier material, though, try using Tyvek in place of the sheet

If you’re feeling adventurous, you could cut the length of PVC pipe in half before sewing it into the sheet—then you can fold it in half before storing it. One of Instructable’s commenters also suggests adding a second piece of PVC pipe to the top edge for added stability, and to make sure the screen hangs straight.

20 Creative Ways to Make the Most of a Tiny Backyard

20 Creative Ways to Make the Most of a Tiny Backyard

 

Source: Country Living

 

1. Tiered Planters

Tiered planters will maximize the ground space you have available for planters and herb boxes.

Get the tutorial at Decor and the Dog.

2. Vertical Herb Garden

Instead of planting horizontally, plant vertically! Use a wood trellis, tin cans, and IKEA pot hangers to recreate this look.

Get the tutorial at Making Lemonade.

3. Faux-Grass Rug

Offering the illusion of luscious green lawn, a faux-grass rug will help make your patio space look bigger than it really is.

See more at Liz Marie Blog.

4. Add Some Depth

You can’t change the size of your backyard, but you can make it seem larger than it actually is by using this neat trick: Hang a few vintage mirrors on your fence so they reflect the surrounding greenery.

See more at The Brambleberry Cottage.

5. Succulent Wall Art

succulents in garden

Use a rectangular plastic tray divided into planting cells to display an enchanting succulent garden like this one.

Get the tutorial.

6. Coffee Can Planters

We didn’t need an incentive to drink more coffee, but now we’re glad we have one.

Get the tutorial at A Beautiful Mess.

7. Invert Your Tomatoes

Tressling and the upkeep of tomato vines can take up a lot of space. So, hang your tomatoes from the roof instead.

Get the tutorial at Bonzai Aphrodite.

8. Build an Herb Spiral 

Plant your herbs in a spiral to fully utilize all the space you have.

Get the tutorial at The Micro Gardener.

9. Make It Mobile

No space? No problem. Put your garden on wheels.

Get the tutorial at Instructables.

10. Mason Jars

Use some Mason jars to plant a cute herb garden that can even be displayed inside your kitchen.

Get the tutorial at Camille Styles.

11. Stack Your Planters

Stack your planters to make a tiered herb garden.

Get the tutorial at Fancy Frugal Life.

12. Grow Mushrooms in an Old Laundry Basket

No need for a full kitchen garden with this super easy trick for growing your own oyster mushrooms.

Get the tutorial at Instructables.

13. Build a Mini Storage Shed

Repurpose old doors and windows into a cute mini gardening shed, just big enough for all of your essential tools.

Get the tutorial at A Cultivated Nest.

14. 
Start Off Small

 Courtesy of Apartment Therapy

Terrariums are a great way to decorate any indoor or outdoor space—and they’re super low maintenance.

Get the tutorial at Apartment Therapy.

15. Make a Small Water Feature

Want a water feature, but don’t think you have enough room to install one? Not anymore.

Get the tutorial at The Garden Glove.

16. Hanging Garden

Another way to cram more greenery onto a backyard patio with minimal square footage—hang your plants in tiered baskets.

Get the tutorial at A Beautiful Mess.

17. Modular Deck Tiles

If you don’t have enough space for a built-in deck, these snap-in deck tiles ares the perfect solution.

Get the tutorial at Apartment Therapy.

18. Stack Up Crates

Make your own vertical garden by stacking crates. Make sure to reinforce them with wood planks!

Get the tutorial at Little Green Dot.

19. Dedicate a Corner 

Use a rolling cart to hold a miniature herb garden that can be brought inside or kept outside.

See more at SF Girl By The Bay.

20. 
Colorful Yarn

Add some color to your yard by hanging upcycled planters made from old soda bottles with colorful yarn.

Get the tutorial at A Beautiful Mess.

 

How to: Make a DIY Modern Concrete Fire Pit from Scratch

How to: Make a DIY Modern Concrete Fire Pit from Scratch

 

There’s nothing better than enjoying your outdoor living space with the glow of a fire pit. Now that the weather is getting nicer for late night hang outs lets check out this simple DIY project.

created at: 08/05/2013

This version is cast of affordable, weather-resistant concrete that creates a sleek, modern look. It’s portable but sturdy, and uses gel fuel, making it possible to have a quick 30-minute post grill session fire. It take a bit of care and proper prep, but this could be made in just a few hours for well under $50 in materials.

created at: 08/01/2013

Tools and Materials: 

 

CASTING THE BOWL

created at: 08/01/2013

Creating this project is all about two components: finding the right materials and working safely. For the main fire bowl, we used the largest mixing bowls we could find. Check your local restaurant or party supply store for extra-large options. I opted for a plastic punch bowl for the outside because I liked the profile shape, and a stainless steel mixing bowl for the inside.

created at: 08/01/2013

Working with concrete isn’t difficult, but it does require some finesse. First, it’s fairly heavy and can be difficult to mix in large batches by hand. Secondly, it’s extra important to use the proper safety gear to prep and execute your project. Work outside or in a well-ventilated area, and cover your work surface with plastic. I covered my bench in a plastic drop cloth, and taped everything down with ScotchBlue™ tape.

 

created at: 08/01/2013

Also, be sure to wear proper safety gear to protect your eyes, skin, and respiratory system. For this, I consulted with 3MDIY.comfor their suggestions of the best products from their 3M Tekk Protectionline. I went with an N95 valved dust mask for sanding and grinding, and long sleeves and refinishing gloves to protect my arms and hands. For my eyes, I opted for these Walter White-style safety goggles, which not only protect from debris but also dust and irritants. Plus, I prefer them when wearing a respirator or dust mask, since they seal tightly and don’t fog up.

 

created at: 08/01/2013

1. Once you’re all prepped, spray your molds with non-stick spray. This will help release the concrete once it’s dry. A thin, even layer over the inside of the outer mold/outside of the inner mold will do.

 

created at: 08/01/2013

2. Then, mix up your concrete. It’s hard to determine how much you’ll need, but it’s better to mix up more as you start than to rush to create more in the middle. I used about 1/3 of a bag for this project, adding water a little at a time until the mix formed a thick, cookie batter-like consistency. Make sure you’re wearing your safety gear here; this is the time when most of the particulates and irritants are flying around.

 

created at: 08/01/2013

3. Then, use the trowel to add the concrete mix to the outer mold. Fill it about half full, then check the inner mold to see how high the concrete comes up to the side. It’s okay to take the inner mold in and out a few times, just make sure you don’t lose all your non-stick spray. (You can wipe it clean and reapply). A friend or extra pair of hands is helpful here. Then, use weights or rocks to keep it in place. Some things to watch out for:

  • As you place the inner mold, make sure that it’s centered so your bowl will have an even thickness all the way around
  • Keep the lips of the bowls coplanar for an even, symmetrical finished product
  • Adjust the weights so that you have the biggest inner bowl as possible while keeping the structure thick enough to be strong. You’ll want to be sure that there’s enough space on the inside to place your gel canisters beneath the lip of the bowl.

 

created at: 08/01/2013

4. For a super smooth finished surface, try this tip (I picked this up years ago from an episode of This Old House, I think): use something with a motor to vibrate the bowl to remove any air bubbles inside the mold. Here, I’m using my reciprocating saw without a blade, but anything will work: a powered sander, an oscillating or rotary tool, even an immersion blender.

One it’s settled and things are no longer moving, allow the concrete to cure according to the package directions. (48 hours-ish)

 

FINISHING THE BOWL

created at: 08/01/2013

5. When your concrete has cured, carefully remove it from the mold. I lightly tapped on mine with a rubber mallet, first removing the inner bowl, then freeing the outer. It’s solid at this point, so don’t be afraid, but do be careful since it’s quite heavy.

 

created at: 08/01/2013

6. Use a coarse sanding pad (60-80 grit) to clean up the top lip, and give everything a nice rounded profile. Again, since you’ll be generating a lot of fine particulate dust, wear your safety glasses, gloves, and dust mask.

 

created at: 08/01/2013

Wipe away the debris, then give the whole thing a round of fine grit (220) sandpaper. Since concrete doesn’t have any fibers or grain like wood, you don’t have to work your way up. Any sanding is just the removal of irregularities or smoothing things up.

 

ASSEMBLING THE FIRE PIT

created at: 08/01/2013

7. Lastly, take it outside, and place the gel fuel canisters inside. I found mine at a local fireplace/swimming pool/outdoor recreation store, but you can find them in some hardware or home improvement stores or online.

 

created at: 08/01/2013

8. Place the grill grate in the bowl. The one I used was a 14.5″ bottom grate (for the charcoal, not the cooking surface) for a Weber kettle grill. It rested perfectly about 1/2″ from the surface of my 15″ internal diameter bowl. If you can’t find one, you can cut a larger one to size with a hacksaw or grinder, or create your own from hardware cloth or steel mesh.

9. Then, cover the grate with a layer of rocks. I’m using “Mexican beach pebbles” that I found at a garden center. These are commonly used with fire, so I can be sure they’ll stand up to the heat and won’t explode into flaming shrapnel with extended use. So, just be sure that whatever rocks you’re using are appropriate for the purpose.

created at: 08/05/2013

LIGHT IT UP!

While the flames on these aren’t bonfire-sized, the gel canisters put out quite a bit of heat, and all kinds of fun ambiance. At some point, I’d like to make a few of these and place them around my patio or deck. (At some point, I’d also like to have a patio or deck). But, for about $40 in materials (many of which I can reuse), I have a great, easy-to-use backyard fire solution, that requires nearly zero work to start or snuff out, and can keep our outdoor hangouts going well past sundown.

created at: 08/05/2013

 

source: manmadediy

After S&K Renovates Your Kitchen, Use a Cabinet to Make This!

So you’ve hired us to remodel your kitchen and now you’ve got all these old cabinet boxes left over. Hold onto one of them to create this great arts and crafts station for kids! Rachel Pereira, from eHow.com gives a great tutorial on how to complete this quick and easy DIY project that will take your kid’s craft area from disaster to stunner. Everything from a storage area to a chalk board all in one package.

Now there’s quite a bit of work involved with this project, so if it’s something you’re not comfortable with just talk to us and we’d be glad to add it in to your project!

 

Check out this before and after –

 

Things You’ll Need

 

Step 1: Disassemble the Cabinet

Using a mallet or hammer, remove the back of the cabinet from the cabinet face. If drawer slides are attached to the cabinet face inside the cabinet, remove them with a Phillips screwdriver. Use the mallet to loosen the sides and bottom of the cabinet from the cabinet face, as well as the drawer sides and bottom from the drawer face. Needle-nose pliers may be used to remove any staples. Remove pulls or knobs with a screwdriver.

 

Step 2: Build the Desk Base

Measure the length and width of the cabinet face. Using a circular saw, cut a one-by-three pine board into two long pieces that are equivalent to the length of the cabinet face and two short pieces that are 1 1/2 inches shorter than the width of the cabinet face. For example, the cabinet face used in this tutorial is 31 inches long and 21 inches wide. Two boards were cut at 31 inches and two boards were cut at 19 inches. Adjust these measurements depending on the size of your cabinet face.

Drill 3/4-inch pocket holes along the long pieces of wood, spaced about 4 to 5 inches apart. Drill 3/4-inch pocket holes along the long side of the short pieces of wood, and then two pocket holes on either end. Use wood glue and 1 1/4-inch pocket hole screws to screw the short boards to the inside of the long boards so that a box is formed.

Step 3: Attach Desk Base to the Cabinet Face

Using 1 1/4 inch-pocket hole screws and wood glue, attach the desk base to the underside of the cabinet face. Work slowly and do not drive the pocket hole screws too deep so they poke out the other side. Then cut a piece of 1/4-inch plywood to the same dimensions as the cabinet face and attach it to the underside of the desk base with wood glue, 1/2-inch nails and a hammer, spacing nails every 3 inches along the perimeter. An optional alternative to the hammer and nails would be to use a pneumatic or electric nail gun and 18 gauge 1/2-inch nails.

Step 4: Make Holes in the Drawer Face

Using cups or small tin buckets as a template, trace four evenly-spaced circles on the drawer face. If tracing from the base of the cup or bucket, draw the circle about 1/2 inch larger than the actual diameter. Drill holes along the edge of the diameter of the circles with a 1-inch self-feed drill bit, and then use a jigsaw to slowly cut along the perimeter of the circle. Repeat for the remaining three circles.

Step 5: Attach Drawer Face to the Cabinet Face

Place glue along the underside edges of the drawer face and carefully position it on top of the cabinet face over the drawer opening. Use a measuring tape if necessary to make sure placement is even on all sides. Clamp the drawer face to the cabinet face and let it dry overnight.

Step 6: Attach Knob to Cabinet Door or Route the Edge

If the cabinet door sits flush with the cabinet face when closed, a knob will need to be attached to easily open the desk. Measure, mark and drill a hole in the center long edge of the cabinet door (the unhinged side) so that it will not interfere with left- or right-handed children. Attach the knob.

Another option is to route the long edge of the cabinet door so a lip is formed for easier opening of the desk. To do this, position the router table guide at 0 inches so half of the round nose bit cuts into the edge of the door. Remove the screws from the hinges on the cabinet door and slide it along the router table, following the manufacturer’s instructions. Once the door has run through twice (to ensure an even cut along the entire long edge), sand the cut edges with 220 grit sandpaper to remove splinters.

Step 7: Fill Holes and Sand the Desk

Use wood filler to fill the holes from the cabinet pull, seams and places where the desk base join with the cabinet face. Let it dry for several hours. Sand the pre-finished cabinet door, drawer and base with 150 grit sandpaper by hand, or use an orbital sander to remove the protective finish and make it easier for paint to adhere to the surface. Sand the areas where wood filler was used and all edges with 220 grit sandpaper to ensure there are no sharp corners or splinters.

Step 8: Attach Feet to the Desk

On the four corners under the desk base, mark and pre-drill holes for the table leg straight top mounting plates. Attach the table legs into place using the screws provided with the mounting plates. Be sure to screw in the legs until tight.

Step 9: Paint the Desk

Use a 2-inch paintbrush and white latex paint + primer in semi-gloss finish to paint the entire desk, except the center of the cabinet door. Apply two coats and let dry completely. Use a 3-inch foam roller brush to paint the center of the cabinet door with chalkboard paint. Apply two to three coats and let the desk dry for 24 hours.

Step 10: Place Small Tin Buckets in the Holes

Place small tin buckets or cups in the four holes that were cut out earlier, and fill with crayons, pencils, chalk, scissors or other school supplies.

This desk provides great storage for supplies and crafts! Your kids will love it, and you’ll love the contained mess!